More Than Sleep Episode 30: Tips for Mamas Who Are Exclusively Pumping

By Carrie Bruno

July 8, 2019

Carrie is the founder of The Mama Coach. She is a RN, IBCLC lactation consultant, sleep consultant and mama of two little guys. She leads the nationwide team of Mama Coaches and is committed to making motherhood easier.

Welcome to More Than Sleep Show With The Mama Coach!

This is a no judgement zone where we cover all things motherhood. From Pregnancy to breastfeeding, sleep and everything in between- we’re here for support!

Welcome to our  “More than Sleep” show!

I want you all to know this is a safe space- ask me anything and lets talk about all things motherhood!

You can find us Mondays and Wednesdays at 9:30 am MST. Maybe the baby is sleeping? Tune in.. and tune in if he’s not and maybe we can help!

Today on More Than Sleep With The Mama Coach:

Tips for Mamas Who Are Exclusively Pumping

Hey mama! I’m so glad you can join me here today because today I really wanted to chat with you about pumping! Let me start off by saying that if you are exclusively pumping- GOOD ON YOU! As it is not an easy task- and I want you know that I’m here to help! Every breastfeeding journey is different and sometimes challenges can arise that we didn’t anticipate! Pumping is a common path many mamas choose when they face issues with breastfeeding. Today I wanted to chat about the two ways you can make exclusive pumping sustainable long-term.  

1. Set Up a Pumping Schedule

Create a Pumping schedule that doesn’t involve pumping and feeding all in one session. This can be very long and stressful over time. Instead, try to space the two out.  What I would suggest is to keep track of how often your baby eats, which will tell you how many pumping sessions you will need to do in a day. You’ll likely want to do a couple sessions in the morning and 1-2 sessions at night as that’s when your prolactin levels are highest which will create more volume.

 2. Try to Illicit a Second Letdown

What that means is when you’re pumping you’ll notice suddenly you’re producing more volume, then shortly after you will feel the initial let down, and then eventually the breastmilk will stop pumping into the bottle. I would suggest you keep pumping for 5 minutes longer after that for two reasons:

  1. A. It’s good stimulation for more supply the next time
  2. B. It can illicit a second letdown – which means another surge of milk thus more volume.

How much breastmilk should I pump?

Every baby different but try to aim for approx. 2.5 oz per 1 kg of your baby’s weight and divide that up into the amount of feeds you will be having. Bonus Tip:  Make sure you have a good pump! By a good pump I mean double electric one, preferably hospital grade. My favorite pump is the Medela electric pump! if you’re not sure which one is best for you send us a message! If you need help setting up a pumping schedule we’re here to help! Reach out to a Mama Coach in your area to get started!    

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